User Experience Is Top of Mind for the New US National Park Service (NPS) App

National Park Service
With more than 420 national parks, the official National Park Service app enables users to explore exciting parks near and far. It offers news, events, maps and visiting information, including visitor centers, lodging, ad other amenities. It even has a passport stamp to keep track of the parks you visit.

ECU is particularly excited about this app because our team assisted NPS to develop, test, and deploy the user-centric native mobile app, which is already tracking at over 1.8 million impressions on iOS. Download it (iOS or Android) at http://bitly.ws/eUrq

To help you get outside, our team has some recommendations for you. Be sure to check out more of our faves in a future blog.

Glacier National Park, Montana Hany Anbar, Director of Digital Customer Experience

Glacier National Park, Montana
For me, the most spectacular and remote place on Earth is Glacier National Park. When I first visited it, I camped in total darkness for days and traversed a number of glaciers from one end to the other by foot, canoe or kayak. When most of the plants are dormant in winter, you have space to see the majestic ice on so many peaks that surrounds them–including one glacier that sits atop the skyline at every turn. You also get a chance to explore “the backside” or sun-drenched slopes near Logan Pass, where you’ll find an incredible amount of wildflowers—in July and August, they look more like colorful carpets. 

There’s something about experiencing just how large our nation is and how small we really are when visiting that park. It opens you up to seeing life in an entirely new way. It was at these depths within the park where I found myself not only among some of the most beautiful landscapes you’ll ever see but also among some of the last great wild places left on earth. It’s tough because no matter how many trees you’ve seen or mountain tops you’ve climbed — there are always new wonders waiting to be found once again, like a living book full of stories that never end.

 

Muir National Monument, California

Jackie Krick, CEO

Muir National Monument is one of my favorite parks. Its flora hosts some of the tallest trees on earth—the coastal redwoods. The tallest coastal redwood at Muir Woods is about 258 feet, approximately the height of a six-foot person stacked head to toe 45 times. These trees can reach heights up to 379 feet, 74 feet taller than the Statue of Liberty. Redwoods can live up to 2,200 years. The average age of the coastal redwoods at Muir Woods is between 600 to 800 years, with the oldest being at least 1,200 years old.  It’s also a beautiful drive.

Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

Thomas Becher, APR, Director of PR & Marketing Services

I’ve been fortunate to have visited dozens of national parks, sites and monuments over the years — from the alligator-infested Everglades in Florida to the mystical mist of Olympic National Park in Washington state. And from the red-hued, craggy parks of the desert southwest to the hypothermic waters of Acadia in Maine. But my siren call comes from closer to home – Shenandoah National Park.

With its vista-riddled drive along Skyline Drive and 500 miles of hiking trails up and down rocky, wooded ridgelines with spectacular views, Shenandoah has it all close to Washington, D.C., so you don’t have to drive for days to enjoy. While you may see more crowds than at more remote parks, you won’t need long to find an empty trail or isolated peak to make you feel like the only one on earth.

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